Why Are Spiders Such A Problem In Fall?

There are many who believe that spiders are an overwintering pest, and that this is why they are such a problem in the fall. The truth is, the kind of spiders that you find inside your home in fall were probably already there, and the kind of spiders that live in nature, don't have a lot of incentive to get into your home. Here are some things you should know.

Outside spiders, that have been living here in North America for centuries, wouldn't have made it long if they needed to live in houses to survive the winter. Fortunately, they are gifted with a sort of anti-freeze that allows them to survive temperatures that would easily kill other cold-blooded creatures. This anti-freeze makes it unnecessary for them to come into your home for warmth. They may, however, come into your home for other reasons, like available food or water.

Some experts say that fewer than 5% of the spiders found indoors have never been outdoors. So, if you're seeing more spiders inside during the fall, it isn't because the outside spiders are coming in. It is more because spiders tend to mate during the fall months, and the spiders you're seeing are on the lookout for a mate.

Another reason indoor spiders, and outdoors spiders, will become more noticeable in fall, is that they have had time to grow all summer long. When they start out, they can be quite small. But, once they're the size of a quarter and building large webs everywhere, it is hard to ignore them.

So, how do you deal with fall spiders? The secret isn't to seal up your exterior walls--although that is certainly a good idea if you want to keep a ton of other overwintering pests out--the secret is to address the population of indoor spiders with direct pest control.

One of the easiest things you can do to make those spiders go away is to get rid of their webs when you see them. This can cause them to leave the common areas of your home and go back into the wall voids and crawl spaces where they came from.

It is unwise to use insecticides unless you have an education in the proper control of spiders. Insecticides can poison more than just spiders.

The only effective way to deal with house spiders is to have a certified pest specialist use advanced home pest control protocols, and apply proven materials to cracks, crevices, and voids, to directly target the spider population in your home. If you live in Minnesota, the QualityPro certified team at Adam's Pest Control would be happy to help. We have a proven track record for dealing with a whole host of household pests, and the knowledge and experience to do it safely.

Get a quality of life upgrade. Starting this fall, start living without spiders. It is a lot nicer than living with them.

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